Golang Programming Operators

Operators are symbols that tell the compiler to perform specific operations that may be mathematical, relational or logical. The Golang programming language has a rich in in-built operators that can be grouped into: Arithmetic Operators, Relational Operators, Logical Operators, Bitwise Operators, Assignment Operators and the Misc Operators.

So, let’s dive in and find out about these operators:

#1: Arithmetic Operators
Here are examples of Golang’s arithmetic operators and their uses:

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+

    • ” It adds two operands. For instance if A=20 and B=20 then A+ gives 40 as the answer.

 

    • • “

    • ” It subtracts the second operand from the first operand. For example, if A=20 and B=20 then A – B will yield 0.

 

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*

    • ” It’s used for multiplication of operands. For example, A*B produces 400.

 

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/

    • ” It’s used for division. For instance, A/B produces 1.

 

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%

    • ” It’s a modulus operator—it displays the remainder of a number after an integer division. For instance, B % A yields 0 as a remainder.

 

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++

    • ” It’s an increment operator—it increases integer value by one. For instance, A++ yields 21.

 

    • • “

    ” It’s a decrements operator—it decreases an integer value by one.

#2: Relational Operators
Here are examples of Golang’s relational operators and their uses:

    • • “

==

    • ” It checks whether the values of two operands are equal or not. If they are equal, the condition becomes true. For instance A==B is true if A=20 and B=20.

 

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!=

    • ” It checks whether the values of two operands are equal or not. For instance, A!=B is false.

 

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>

    • ” It checks whether the value of the left operand is greater than what is on the right operand.

 

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<

    • ” It checks whether the value of the left operand is less than what is on the right operand.

 

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>=

    • ” It checks whether the value of the left operand is greater than or equal to what is on the right operand.

 

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<=

    ” It checks whether the value of the left operand is less than or equal to what is on the right operand.

#3: Logical Operators
Here are examples of Golang’s logical operators and their uses:

    • • “

&&

    • ” the logical AND operator. If both the operands are not zero, then condition is true.

 

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||

    • ” the logical OR operator. If any of two operands is not zero, then condition is true.

 

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!

    ” the logical NOT Operator. It reverses the logical state of its initial operand.

#4: Bitwise Operators
The bitwise operators performs bit-by-bit operations in programming. Here are examples of Golang’s bitwise operators and their uses:

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&

    • ” the binary AND operator. It copies a bit to the result if it is existing in both the operands.

 

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|

    • ” the binary OR operator. It copies a bit if it is existing in either operand.

 

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^

    • ” the binary XOR operator. It copies the bit if it is set in only one operand and not both operators.

 

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<<

    • ” the binary left shift operator. It moves the left side by a number of bits that are specified by the right operand.

 

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>>

    ” the binary right shift operator. It moves the right side by a number of bits that are specified by the right operand.

#5: Assignment Operators
Here are examples of Golang’s assignment operators and their uses:

    • • “

=

    • ” It assigns values from right side operands to the left side operand.

 

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+=

    • ” It adds the right operand to left operand and assign the answer to left operand.

 

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-=

    • ” It subtracts the right operand to left operand and assign the answer to left operand.

 

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*=

    • ” It multiplies the right operand to left operand and assign the answer to left operand.

 

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/=

    ” It divides the right operand to left operand and assign the answer to left operand.

#6: Misc Operators
Here are examples of Golang’s misc operators and their uses:

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&

    • ” It returns the address of a given variable.

 

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*

    ” It’s a pointer to a particular variable.

Now you can begin using Golang’s operators.

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